William Blake and the Spiritual Form of Tony Blair, by Rod Tweedy

The Rise and Fall of Urizen: Psychopathy and Rationality

The Spiritual Form of Blair-4 3Screenshot 2022-08-14 at 16.21.23

Screen Shot 2021-05-10 at 10.39.26

Introduction: The Triumph of the Left Hemisphere

In his startling conclusion to his illuminated prophecy Jerusalem: The Emanation of the Giant Albion, Blake depicts Urizen (“your Reason”) in his final, contemporary form: completely dissociated or divided: no longer the originally luminous and enlightening power within the human brain, that he had once been, but now a totally unempathic, ruthless, manipulative drive, obsessed only with power and control. Blake refers to this “debased” or “insane” and dysfunctional form of the former “Holy Reasoning Power” as the “Red Dragon”, “the Dragon Urizen”.

Read More

Blake and Zoroastrianism, by Mary Jackson

Ahriman and Ormazd: The Creation of Urizen and the Billateral Mind

img_1127459_36102374_0 (1)

Screen Shot 2021-11-02 at 17.46.49

Screen Shot 2021-05-10 at 10.39.26

There is considerable evidence that Blake was influenced by Zoroastrian and Mithraic iconography in several illuminations for his and other’s poetry. When one compares the figures of god and daeva (diabolical spirit) with Blake’s drawings and engravings, the sheer number of parallels argues convincingly for some form of influence. Were there no other data than this to prove that Blake may have incorporated elements of representations of the bull-slaying ritual, of Arimanes or Ahriman, god of dark, and Ormazd, god of light, into his visual art, the evidence would seem persuasive.

Read More

How Morality Damns Us: Blake and the Tree of Good and Evil, by Erik McCarthy

Going Beyond Good & Evil: Restoring Eden in the Brain 

Screen Shot 2021-06-29 at 15.24.05

Screen Shot 2021-06-29 at 15.13.37-thisScreen Shot 2021-06-29 at 19.42.36

Screen Shot 2021-05-10 at 10.39.26

Introduction: Blake’s Laocoön and the serpents of Morality 

Screen Shot 2021-03-02 at 21.57.19

The original Laocoön. In Blake’s reading, the serpents overcoming the priest represent the twin Powers or programs of “Good” and “Evil”, which eventually suffocate him, and his vision of God.

The question, and questioning, of morality, is central to one of Blake’s most iconic and futuristic images, the Laocoön. Even though Blake’s best-known works often combine image and text in a single plate, the Laocoön stands apart as the only one to be centered around a faithful copy of a piece of antique sculpture, a fact which attests to its hold on his imagination.

Another arresting feature of the plate is the atypical density of its textual matter, composed in at least two distinct scripts and three different languages, and the seemingly arbitrary, discontinuous manner of its arrangement on the page. Julia Wright observes, “the design recalls a jigsaw puzzle more than a page from an emblem book, graffiti more than an engraving, and marginal annotations more than aphorisms on art” . 

It resembles no other work by Blake, and he left no instructions on how his wide-ranging statements should be organized, or in what order they should be read. Without an obvious starting point, one could try a conventional approach, beginning with the first line of horizontal text at the top of the page: “Where any view of Money exists Art cannot be carried on but War only”; but then one could just as well start at the bottom, with the caption identifying the three figures as “הי & his two sons Satan & Adam.” Either way, the reader is sure not to get far before having to stop and decide where to begin again; and from there one choice seems as good as another.

Read More