Blake in New York: Power, Symbolism, and Luciferianism, by Vigilant Citizen

Symbols Rule the World, not Words or Laws

‘Wisdom’, Entrance to the Rockefeller Center, New York. Sculpture created by Lee Lawrie, after William Blake

New York is essentially a spiritual city, one of the most occult and esoteric cities on Earth. As David Ovason has suggested in The Secret Architecture of our Nation’s Capital, New York – like Washington DC (the main focus of his study) – is laid out according to a whole matrix of secret symbolism and occult geometry.

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The influence of Jacob Boehme on the work of Blake, by Bryan Aubrey

Blake, Boehme, and Left Brain Verstand 

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Boehme’s influence on Blake, although often acknowledged, is frequently underestimated and has never been comprehensively investigated. Much modern criticism regards Blake’s work as non-transcendental, even secular. This is partly a reaction against earlier criticism, which was more sympathetic to Blake’s connection with the mystical tradition. The argument of this article, however, is that Boehme exerted a continuous and pervasive influence on Blake, and that recognition of this can illumine some of the most difficult and contradictory elements in Blake’s work. These include the attitude to the body and the senses, and the metaphysical status of the selfhood and the created world.

Boehme’s system represents a synthesis of many different currents of thought, including the Dionysian via negativa, the Hermetic tradition, the Kabbalah and the Lutheran faith. It is emphasized, however, that his philosophy arose from intense mystical experience rather than academic study, and that he chose to express it in symbolic and mythological terms rather than rational concepts.

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